Researchers

0-24 Months

Intellectuals

Ages 2 – 3

Specialists

Ages 3 – 4

Professors

Ages 4 – 5

Researchers

0-24 Months

“Play, Play Play.” Children at this time learn best through play and sensory activities. Little Scholars has crafted a program to help your child reach appropriate developmental milestones through the use of floor-time play, sensory exploration, singing, and modeling speech patterns. We use Finger Play Program to keep your child entertained and engaged from 6 months on.

Important Milestones

Learning Center - Group 1184@2x 150x150

Intellectual

Infants and toddlers learn by exploring with their hands and mouth. They bang, throw, drop, shake, and put items in their mouths. Talking begins with babbling, which leads to gradually learning to say and respond to simple words and phrases. By age 2, a child typically will have a vocabulary of 50 words. As they learn to speak, they’ll use two- and three word sentences, like “More juice,” “Me want cookie,” and “Up, up.”

Learning Center - Group 1184@2x 150x150

Emotional

Children smile and giggle when they want more of something. They turn their head, shut their eyes, or cry when they want less of something. Crying is the primary means of communication when infants’ and toddlers’ needs are not being met. It is not a sign of misbehavior or manipulation. Young children learn to manage their emotions through the ways parenting adults and others respond to them positively, are dependable, and show that enjoy being together.

Learning Center - Group 1184@2x 150x150

Physical

Children will first learn to hold their head up. Little by little, they will learn to roll and to sit (usually by six months). Usually by 24 months, children learn to creep, then crawl, pull themselves up, walk while holding onto furniture, stand, and then walk two or three steps without help. At 24 months, children can begin to run, kick a ball, and walk up and down stairs (while holding onto someone’s hand). Young children may catch a lot of viruses or infections that go around. As they do, they build up their body’s ability to fight off infections in the future.

Learning Center - Group 1184@2x 150x150

Social

Young children learn to use smiles, cries, and other expressions to build connections with parents and others, guiding them to what the child wants or needs. Positive responses reinforce growth. Young children imitate facial expressions, and even develop a smile by three months. Infants and toddlers respond to changes in other people’s behaviors, facial expressions, and emotions. They learn to interact as others respond appropriately to what they do. Toddlers will play in parallel—near another child, but not with that child.

Intellectuals

Ages 2 – 3

“What is this?” At this time children are curious. They are curious about themselves and the world around them. They are trying to figure out what role everyone plays including themselves and apply these newly found ideas. Through the help of Frog Street, Little Scholars can navigate all the feelings, emotions, and the thirst for knowing and doing more.

Important Milestones

Learning Center - Group 1184@2x 150x150

Intellectual

Children are starting to understand concepts like time and opposites – for example, big/small and day/night. They also start to point to body parts based on what they do, sort objects, and match shapes and colors. And starting to remember what some things look like – for example, apples look red and round. Around two years, your toddler might be able to use sentences of 2-3 words and say ‘I’, ‘you’ and ‘me’. He’ll learn and use lots of words and will be easier to understand when he’s talking. At three years, your child will be able to use sentences of 3-5 words, or even more. She’ll start learning how to take turns when speaking, and might be able to have a short conversation with you.

Learning Center - Group 1184@2x 150x150

Emotional

Your toddler is going through lots of emotions while also learning about other people’s feelings. Temper tantrums are normal, because children often don’t know how to put words to ‘big’ emotions like frustration, anger, embarrassment, guilt and shame. Your toddler is also starting to understand how her behavior affects you and how your behavior affects her. She won’t have as much separation anxiety, and she might not get so upset when you leave her.

Learning Center - Group 1184@2x 150x150

Physical

Your toddler can run and will probably fall less. He’s starting to walk up and down stairs on his own, but will sometimes use the rail for balance. He’s now better at throwing overarm, kicking and catching a ball, and might even stand on one foot for a few seconds. If you’re around while your child explores, she feels reassured and safe. This helps your child to build confidence to try new things and explore on her own.

Learning Center - Group 1184@2x 150x150

Social

Your child will enjoy playing with others, playing dress ups, having tea parties, painting with his fingers or a brush. When he plays with you or other children, you might find that your child is getting better at taking turns. Telling stories, singing and reading are also fun things for your child to do at this age. Everyday skills Around this time, your child is keen to do more things for herself.

Specialists

Ages 3 – 4

“Look at me!” Your little one is moving away from the “wow” factor of the everyday to trying to apply and develop further their newly a quired skills, understandings, and capacities. Little Scholars will help your child develop new ideas through play, modeling, and learning materials that measure your child’s ability and growth. With the help you programs such as “Happily Ever After” we can attend to every child’s learning and developmental needs.

Important Milestones

Learning Center - Group 1184@2x 150x150

Intellectual

This year, kids start thinking about the world in new ways. You may see some creative approaches to tackling tasks and activities. By the end of this year, kids typically can: Three-year-old’s have a lot to say. They also understand more of what you say—even though they may not always follow directions. At this age they typically can: Use the basic rules of grammar, but make mistakes with words that don’t follow the rules, like saying “mouses” instead of “mice” Speak well enough that most strangers understand what they’re saying. Use five or six words in a sentence and have a two- to three-sentence conversation Tell you their name, the name of at least one friend, and the names of most common objects Understand words like in, on, behind, and next Ask “wh” questions like “Why?” to get more information about things

Learning Center - Group 1184@2x 150x150

Emotional

At this age, kids show an interesting mix of independence, playfulness, and fearfulness. As they approach age 4, most 3-year-olds do these things: Be interested—although hesitant—about going new places and trying new things Start to play with other kids (as opposed to only playing side-by-side) Start being able to comfort and show concern for an unhappy friend without prompting Take turns while playing (even if they don’t like to!) Play “real life” with toys like play kitchens Start finding simple ways to solve arguments and disagreements Show (but maybe not name) a variety of emotions beyond happy, sad, and mad

Learning Center - Group 1184@2x 150x150

Physical

This year, kids really work hard to refine the motor skills that they have developed in earlier stages of life. They start doing some new things, too, especially with fine motor skills (small muscle movement). Most 3-year-olds learn to do things like these by the time they’re 4: Run and walk without tripping over own feet Jump, hop, and stand on one foot Walk backwards and climb stairs one foot after the other Kick and throw a small ball Catch a big ball (most of the time) Climb Start pedaling a tricycle or bike Draw a circle with a crayon, pencil, or marker Play with toys that have small moving parts and/or buttons Turn the pages of a book one at a time Build with Mega Blocks and create towers of six or more blocks Work door handles and open twist-on bottle tops

Learning Center - Group 1184@2x 150x150

Social

At this age, kids show an interesting mix of independence, playfulness, and fearfulness. As they approach age 4, most 3-year-olds do these things: Be interested—although hesitant—about going new places and trying new things Start to play with other kids (as opposed to only playing side-by-side) Start being able to comfort and show concern for an unhappy friend without prompting Take turns while playing (even if they don’t like to!) Play “real life” with toys like play kitchens Start finding simple ways to solve arguments and disagreements Show (but maybe not name) a variety of emotions beyond happy, sad, and mad

Professors

Ages 4 – 5

“Yes we can.” Through a carefully guided STEM program and allowing children to self-direct their play and learning Little Scholars has developed a system that promotes every child’s developmental domains for a life time love of learning.

Important Milestones

Learning Center - Group 1184@2x 150x150

Intellectual

Imaginary play is a big part of intellectual development for preschoolers. Children begin to name colors and understand simple counting. They gradually begin to understand the concept of time. Building a strong vocabulary in early childhood is a critical foundation for learning. At age 3, preschoolers typically know about 300 words. That expands to 1,500 words by age 4, and to 2,500 words by age 5. As preschoolers get older, they’ll want more and more independence. That’s best accomplished by maintaining a firm structure and giving them a limited number of choices so they begin learning to make good decisions.

Learning Center - Group 1184@2x 150x150

Emotional

Preschoolers are beginning to understand what they are feeling, but they aren’t really able to manage the emotions. They may giggle uncontrollably at awkward times. Moods can change dramatically from minute to minute as preschoolers learn how to manage their emotions. Preschool age kids move easily between fantasy and reality. Imaginary monsters are as frightening to them as a real threat. Fantasy play can include pretend violence (including online games). Interest in fantasy violence and weapons can be normal at this age; it’s not necessarily cause for alarm.

Learning Center - Group 1184@2x 150x150

Physical

Hopping, climbing, swinging, and doing somersaults begin at this stage. By age 5, many kids can stand on one foot for 10 seconds or more. Children can draw a person with up to four body parts by age 5. They draw circles and begin to learn how to copy a square and some capital letters. They learn how to use scissors. Kids often become frustrated with wanting to do something physically and not being able to do it yet. Thus, they have lots of falls and mishaps.

Learning Center - Group 1184@2x 150x150

Social

Preschoolers shift from “parallel play” to playing together. Often their play focuses more on imagination than toys or games. Imaginary play is one way they “try on” adult roles. Preschool age children are learning to cooperate, solve problems, share, and take turns with others their own age. In the process, they sometimes have to work through conflicts! Preschoolers begin to understand that other people have feelings, and they begin to express empathy and care to friends and family. During these years, children also learn about and experience prejudice and discrimination due to race, gender, and age, often from observing them in adults. Preschoolers need to learn how to deal with conflict and how to solve problems while also managing their emotions and controlling their impulses.